Thursday, March 15, 2012

Critical Access Hospital Ethics Committee Resource Guide


From Dartmouth Medical School's Department of Community & Family Medicine:

Critical access hospitals (CAHs), like all hospitals, frequently encounter ethical challenges, ranging from individual patient care issues to much broader issues, including the economic survival of small rural health care facilities. One useful resource for addressing ethical issues that occur within a CAH is an ethics committee.

Unfortunately, for various reasons, ethics committees are less likely to exist in CAHs, compared to non-rural facilities. To address the need for the development of CAH ethics committees, and overcome the obstacles that may present themselves in this process, Drs. Nelson and Elliott have created the Critical Access Hospital Ethics Committee Resource Guide. The Guide will assist CAH leaders in developing an effective and useful resource for patients, clinicians and administrators in rural health care facilities. The Guide is based on the available research and real-life examples that highlight the challenging and all too familiar ethics conflicts common to rural settings. The Guide is also applicable for those CAHs that already have an ethics committee, but where the members and/or institutional leadership believe that the committee could enhance its effectiveness.

For more information or to download a copy of the resource guide, visit Dartmouth Medical School's Department of Community & Family Medicine website.

Adults with High Cholesterol, 2003 - 2009

Thursday, March 8, 2012

Unduplicated Medicaid Enrollment by County, SFY2011

The map below shows the unduplicated Medicaid enrollment (as a percentage of total population) by county for state fiscal year 2011. The overall enrollment rate for Oklahoma was 25.6%. Rural enrollment was 28.2% (see map of rural Oklahoma). Adair County had the highest enrollment at 43.9% and Osage County had the lowest at 15.1%. Regionally, southeast Oklahoma had the highest enrollment at 32.3%. The lowest regional enrollment was in northwest Oklahoma, including the Panhandle, at 21.3%. Northeast Oklahoma had an enrollment of 25.7% and the southwest region was at 24.7%.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Deaths Due to All Causes, 1999-2007

The map below shows the age-adjusted mortality rate from 1999-2007 by county. The overall  mortality rate for Oklahoma was 948.0 deaths per 100,000 population, with a rate of 965.9 deaths per 100,000 population for rural counties (see map of rural Oklahoma). Adair County had the highest rate at 1,119.8 deaths per 100,000 population and Alfalfa County had the lowest rate at 753.3 deaths per 100,000 population. Regionally, southeast Oklahoma had the highest rate at 1,007.9 deaths per 100,000 population. The lowest regional rate was in northwest Oklahoma, including the Panhandle, at 875.3 deaths per 100,000 population. Northeast Oklahoma had a rate of 946.6 deaths per 100,000 population and the southwest region had a rate of 949.3 deaths per 100,000 population. **Please note that the map below has been corrected. In an earlier post Payne County was incorrectly classified on the map. The new map below places Payne County in the correct category. We apologize for any confusion our error may have caused.***

OSU-CHS to Launch Integrated Rural Medical Track

The Oklahoma State University – Center for Health Sciences, through the OSU Center for Rural Health, is developing comprehensive, rural-specific curriculum that will focus on training a cohort of interested students for rural practice. The new curriculum, called the Rural Medical Track (RMT), will utilize a physiological systems-based approach that integrates biomedical and clinical concepts throughout the entire four-year curriculum. The introduction of the RMT will coincide with a school-wide effort to revise its general curriculum to integrate more biomedical and clinical content.

Published data indicates that the number of United States graduates entering family practice residency programs dropped by 50% between 1997 and 2005 (Bodenheimer, 2006). There is additional concern about where many of the primary care physicians are practicing. In Oklahoma, primary care physicians are concentrated around the Tulsa and Oklahoma City metropolitan areas; however, most Oklahoma counties are designated as Health Professional Shortage Areas and reflect few primary care physicians working in those counties. The RMT will address these barriers by developing and implementing an integrated curriculum to train rural, primary care physicians, with clinical rotations taking place predominantly in rural settings. There is strong evidence that training location and permanent practice location are highly correlated, which indicates that students who complete the majority of their clinical training in rural areas will remain there after graduation (Henry, Edwards, & Crotty, 2009).

Monday, March 5, 2012

Oklahoma Health Information Exchange Trust Update - March 2012

From the March 2012 edition of the Oklahoma Osteopathic Association's Oklahoma D.O., Val Schott, MPH, Chief Executive Officer of the Oklahoma Health Information Exchange Trust (OHIET), provides an update on the Trust's activities for the past month.

Clicking the image will open the article as a PDF.

Friday, March 2, 2012

Do Physicians Have To Do It All?

From the March 2012 edition of the Oklahoma Osteopathic Association's Oklahoma D.O., Richard Perry, MA, Director of the Oklahoma Area Health Education Centers (OKAHEC), explores how various community resources can assist physicians in the delivery of care.

Clicking the image will open the article as a PDF.